Trends


section1=Atmospheric section2=Trends
Atmospheric CO2 record from continuous measurements at Jubany Station, Antarctica updated through 2005  
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/co2/jubany.htm
Dr. Luigi Ciattaglia and  Dr. Claudio Rafanelli . 2006.

The Italian PNRA (National Research Program in Antarctica) have been taking continuous atmospheric CO2 measurements at the Jubany, Antarctica station since 1994 and based on the annual averages calculated from monthly averages, CO2 levels at Jubany have risen from 356.65 in 1994 to 376.75 in 2005.




Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/co2/jubany.htm




section1=CSequestration section2=Trends
USGS Carbon Sequestration Projects  
http://edcintl.cr.usgs.gov/carbonsequestration.html
 The Editor. 2006.

It is clear that the problem of atmospheric CO2 accumulation will not simply go away. Fossil fuel usage is not likely to cease any time soon, either in industrialized or less-developed countries. Therefore, a variety of strategies are needed to reduce CO2 emissions and remove carbon from the atmosphere in order to mitigate the potential effects of climate change. One possible mechanism for climate change mitigation is carbon sequestration, the facilitated redistribution of carbon from the air to soils, terrestrial biomass, geologic formations, and the oceans. For semi-arid and sub-humid regions of the world, carbon sequestration in soils represents the most promising option for climate change mitigation. The USGS/EROS Data Center is currently involved in two projects that focus on the process — and potential — of carbon sequestration in soils as a climate change mitigation strategy.




Addition links on this article: http://edcintl.cr.usgs.gov/carbonsequestration.html




section1=Climate section2=Trends
Global, hemispheric, and zonal temperature deviations derived from radiosonde records updated through 2004  
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/temp/angell/angell.html
Dr.  James K.  Angell. 2006.

Based on data from Angell's global network of 63 radiosonde stations, over the period from 1958 through 2004, the global mean, near-surface air temperature warmed by approximately 0.16°C/decade, the 850-300 mb tropospheric layer warmed by about 0.08°C/decade, the 300-100 mb tropopause layer temperature cooled by approximately -0.24°C/decade (driven mainly by large changes in the Polar zones), and the 100-50 mb low-stratospheric layer cooled by about -0.62°C/decade. At the surface, 2002 remained the warmest year in the 47-year record (0.88°C above the long-term mean), easily exceeding the previous record of 0.71°C/decade set in 1998, which was matched by the 2004 anomaly, thus tying 1998 and 2004 as the second warmest years in the record.




Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/temp/angell/angell.html




section1=Climate section2=Trends
Global, hemispheric, and zonal temperature deviations derived from radiosonde records   
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/temp/angell/angell.html
Dr. James K. Angell. 2006.

Data from a global network of 63 radiosonde stations were used to estimate temperature deviations from 1958 through 2005. These estimates are categorized vertically (for the near-surface, troposphere, tropopause, low stratosphere, and the near-surface up to 100 mb) and horizontally (for the globe, the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and the North and South Polar, North and South Temperate, North and South Subtropical, Tropical, and Equatorial latitudinal zones). Based on data from Angell's global network of 63 radiosonde stations, over the period from 1958 through 2005, the global mean, near-surface air temperature warmed by approximately 0.17°C/decade, the 850-300 mb tropospheric layer warmed by about 0.09°C/decade, the 300-100 mb tropopause layer temperature cooled by approximately -0.23°C/decade (driven mainly by large changes in the Polar zones), and the 100-50 mb low-stratospheric layer cooled by about -0.62°C/decade. At the surface, 2002 remained the warmest year in the 48-year record (0.88°C above the long-term mean), easily exceeding the previous record set in 1998, which was thought to be influenced by the powerful El Niño of 1997-1998. The 2005 surface temperature was the second warmest year in the record with a departure of 0.82°C.




Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/temp/angell/angell.html




section1=Climate section2=Trends
Monthly surface air temperature time series area-averaged over the 30-degree latitudinal belts of the globe   
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/temp/lugina/lugina.html
Dr. K.M. Lugina et al. 2006.

The mean monthly and annual values of surface air temperature compiled by Lugina et al. have been updated through 2004.




Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/temp/lugina/lugina.html




section1=Emissions section2=Trends
Global, Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions   
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/emis/tre_glob.htm
Dr. Gregg Marland et al. 2006.

CDIAC's global fossil-fuel CO2 emission estimates, extending from 1751 - 2003, are now available. The 2003 global fossil-fuel CO2 emission estimate, 7300 million metric tons of carbon, represents an all-time high and a 5% increase from 2002. Globally, liquid and solid fuels accounted for 76.7% of the emissions from fossil-fuel burning in 2003.




Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/emis/tre_glob.htm




section1=Atmospheric section2=Trends
Monthly Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations at 10 Locations Spanning Latitudes 82°N to 90°S   
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/co2/sio-keel.htm
Dr. C.D. Keeling and  Dr. T.P. Whorf. 2005.
Prepared by T.J. Blasing, CDIAC

The monthly Atmospheric CO2 concentrations derived from in situ air samplesatmospheric CO2 mixing ratios at 10 Scripps Institute of Oceanography sites have been updated through 2004. The updated data, along with the methods, trends, and revised graphics are included in Trends Online: A Compendium of Data on Global Change.



For more information contact: cdiac@ornl.gov
Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/co2/sio-keel.htm




section1=Atmospheric section2=Trends
Monthly Atmospheric CO2 Mixing Ratios from the NOAA CMDL Carbon Cycle Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network, 1968-2002   
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/co2/cmdl-flask/cmdl-flask.html
Dr. P.P. Tans and  Dr.  T.J.  Conway. 2005.

The monthly atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios from the NOAA/CMDL Carbon Cycle Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network have been updated with data extending from 1968-2002. The updated data, along with the methods, trends, and revised graphics are now included in Trends Online: A Compendium of Data on Global Change.




Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/co2/cmdl-flask/cmdl-flask.html