Data


section1=TraceGases section2=Data
AGAGE Updates and Information  
http://agage.eas.gatech.edu/
  The Editor. 2006.

In the ALE/GAGE/AGAGE global network program, continuous high frequency gas chromatographic measurements of two biogenic/anthropogenic gases (methane, CH4; nitrous oxide, N2O) and six anthropogenic gases (chlorofluorocarbons CFCl3, CF2Cl2, and CF2ClCFCl2; methyl chloroform, CH3CCl3; chloroform, CHCl3; and carbon tetrachloride, CCl4) have been carried out at five globally distributed sites for over 20 years. Data are currently available for all of the species, although chloroform data are only available for recent years. Additional important species have been added at select sites during the course of the program. These include: hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO), methyl chloride (CH3Cl), methyl bromide (CH3Br), HFC-134a, HFC-152a, HCFC-141b, HCFC-142b, HCFC-22, Halons 1211 and 1301, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), methylene chloride (CH2C12), trichloroethylene (C2HC13), and tetrachloroethylene (C2C14). The last 3 short-lived gases arise from solvents; AGAGE is attempting to assess their source terms, trends, and seasonal influences that are related to their destruction by the hydroxyl (OH) radical. Units are dry air mole fractions in parts per 10 12 (picomoles/mole) for all halocarbons and SF6, and parts per 10 9 (nanomoles/mole) for nitrous oxide, methane, carbon monoxide and hydrogen.


The current station locations are Cape Grim, Tasmania (41° S, 145° E), Cape Matatula, American Samoa (14° S, 171° E), Ragged Point, Barbados (13° N, 59° W), Mace Head, Ireland (53° N, 10° W), and Trinidad Head, California (41° N, 124° W)(Pictured below). Stations also previously existed at Cape Meares, Oregon (45° N, 124° W), and Adrigole, Ireland (52° N, 10° W). The Mace Head station came on line in January, 1987 as a replacement for the Adrigole station which ceased operations at the end of December, 1983; the Trinidad Head station began operations during AGAGE in October 1995, as an essential replacement for the Cape Meares station from which GAGE data were not available after June, 1989.





Addition links on this article: http://agage.eas.gatech.edu/




section1=Climate section2=Data
CDIAC Web-based user interface now offers U.S. monthly climate data   
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/epubs/ndp/ushcn/newushcn.html
Dr. C. N. Williams et al. 2005.
Prepared by Dale Kaiser, CDIAC

The recently introduced graphical user interface offering daily USHCN data now offers users monthly climate data through 2002. Users may download data for individual variables, from individual stations, for whatever time period the user desires. Not only can data be downloaded and saved, but users may also plot data from individual stations in a number of ways, yielding insight into the station's record, and thereby helping to determine the suitability of a station's data for particular applications. The USHCN monthly data are also available directly from the CDIAC ftp area (hhttp://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/ftp/ushcn_monthly/).



For more information contact: kaiserdp@ornl.gov
Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/epubs/ndp/ushcn/newushcn.html




section1=Oceans section2=Data
Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Maurice Ewing Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A17, 4 January21 - March 1994  
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/oceans/ndp_084/ndp084.html
Dr. A. Rios et al. 2005.
Prepared by Alex Kozyr, CDIAC

The procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), and pH at hydrographic stations during the R/V Maurice Ewing cruise in the South Atlantic Ocean on the A17 WOCE section has been published.



For more information contact: kozyra@ornl.gov
Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/oceans/ndp_084/ndp084.html




section1=Climate section2=Data
"Climatic Atlas of Clouds over Land" available from the University of Washington Web site   
http://www.atmos.washington.edu/~ignatius/CloudMap/
  The Editor. 2005.

Drs. Carole J. Hahn and Stephen G. Warren have recently produced an online, gridded atlas using the cloud observations data contained in the CDIAC numeric data package (NDP-026D), "Cloud Climatology for Land Stations Worldwide, 1971-1996." The maps included in this atlas were based on analyses of 185 million visual cloud observations made at 5388 weather stations on continents and islands over the 26-year period from 1971-1996. For detailed information on CDIAC NDP-026D, please see the following: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/epubs/ndp/ndp026d/ndp026d.html




Addition links on this article:  http://www.atmos.washington.edu/~ignatius/CloudMap/




section1=SeaLevel section2=Data
Looking for information on coastal hazards in the U.S.?  
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/by_new/bysubjec.html#coast
  The Editor. 2005.

Rising ocean temperatures, warmer air, and changing currents, all a part of the ongoing change in climate, are helping to break up large ice shelves, thereby, resulting in a rise in sea level. CDIAC holdings include coastal hazards data bases for the east, west, and gulf coasts. For informatation offered by CDIAC on coastal sensitivity to sea level, please see the following: A Coastal Hazards Data Base for the U.S. East Coast - (http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/ndps/ndp043a.html); A Coastal Hazards Data Base for the U.S. Gulf Coast (http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/ndps/ndp043b.html); and A Coastal Hazards Data Base for the U.S. West Coast (http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/epubs/ndp/ndp043c/43c.htm).




Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/by_new/bysubjec.html#coast