Climate


section1=Climate section2=Events
Young Scientist Network meeting,   
http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/tss/staff/mahowald/ysn
 The  Editor. 2006.

We'd like to bring your attention to a Young Scientist Network meeting, organized by Analysis, Integration and Modeling of the Earth System (AIMES) project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Project (IGBP). The meeting will focus on urbanization interactions with biogeochemistry and climate and take place September 9-10 2006 in Mexico City. For more information see additional link.




Addition links on this article: http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/tss/staff/mahowald/ysn




section1=Climate section2=Highlights
U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) now being developed at NCDC  
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/uscrn/
  NCDC. 2006.
Prepared by D.P. Kaiser, CDIAC

The U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) is a network of climate stations now being developed as part of a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) initiative. Its primary goal is to provide future long-term homogeneous observations of temperature and precipitation that can be coupled to long-term historical observations for the detection and attribution of present and future climate change. Data from the USCRN will be used in operational climate monitoring activities and for placing current climate anomalies into an historical perspective. The USCRN will also provide the United States with a reference network that meets the requirements of the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). If fully implemented, the network will consist of about 110 stations nationwide. Implementation of the USCRN is contingent on the availability of funding. Over time, this new network will in effect supplement the U.S. Historical Climatology Network (USHCN) (http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/epubs/ndp019/ndp019.html) in terms of monitoring the US climate.



For more information contact: kaiserdp@ornl.gov
Addition links on this article: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/uscrn/




section1=Climate section2=Trends
Global, hemispheric, and zonal temperature deviations derived from radiosonde records   
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/temp/angell/angell.html
Dr. James K. Angell. 2006.

Data from a global network of 63 radiosonde stations were used to estimate temperature deviations from 1958 through 2005. These estimates are categorized vertically (for the near-surface, troposphere, tropopause, low stratosphere, and the near-surface up to 100 mb) and horizontally (for the globe, the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and the North and South Polar, North and South Temperate, North and South Subtropical, Tropical, and Equatorial latitudinal zones). Based on data from Angell's global network of 63 radiosonde stations, over the period from 1958 through 2005, the global mean, near-surface air temperature warmed by approximately 0.17°C/decade, the 850-300 mb tropospheric layer warmed by about 0.09°C/decade, the 300-100 mb tropopause layer temperature cooled by approximately -0.23°C/decade (driven mainly by large changes in the Polar zones), and the 100-50 mb low-stratospheric layer cooled by about -0.62°C/decade. At the surface, 2002 remained the warmest year in the 48-year record (0.88°C above the long-term mean), easily exceeding the previous record set in 1998, which was thought to be influenced by the powerful El Niño of 1997-1998. The 2005 surface temperature was the second warmest year in the record with a departure of 0.82°C.




Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/temp/angell/angell.html




section1=Climate section2=Trends
Monthly surface air temperature time series area-averaged over the 30-degree latitudinal belts of the globe   
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/temp/lugina/lugina.html
Dr. K.M. Lugina et al. 2006.

The mean monthly and annual values of surface air temperature compiled by Lugina et al. have been updated through 2004.




Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/temp/lugina/lugina.html




section1=Climate section2=Publications
Recent Study Suggests Decreased Cloud Cover Over China   
Dale P. Kaiser and   Yun  Qian. 2006.

Work performed by Yun Qian, CDIAC’s Dale Kaiser, and others which appeared in a recent issue of Geophysical Research Letters suggests China has experienced significant decreases in cloud cover over the past fifty years. The work was made possible by newly available data from an extended weather station network in China. Over the past half of the Twentieth century, the total cloud cover and low cloud cover have decreased 0.88% and 0.33% each decade, respectively. Meanwhile, both solar radiation and pan evaporation have decreased in China. By combining these results, there is speculation that increased air pollution may have produced a fog-like haze that reflected or absorbed radiation from the sun resulting in less solar radiation reaching the surface. The increasing amount of air pollution is a result of China’s increasing population. Emissions from the consumption of fossil fuels has increased about 9-fold in China since the 1950s and such a dramatic increase in the emissions of pollutants can result in a significant increase in anthropogenic aerosol loading in the atmosphere and affect the climate and hydrological cycle. Researchers have found that the aerosols are forcing more radiation into the atmosphere, which can result in dimming and cause a variety of problems. These problems include cooling of the surface, stabilizing the atmosphere, and reducing evaporation, which may lead to changes in the regional climate and hydrological cycle.









section1=Climate section2=Events
86th and 87th Annual AMS meeting  
http://www.ametsoc.org/meet/annual/
 The Editor. 2006.

The 86th AMS Annual Meeting was held 29 January to 2 February 2006 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, GA, USA. Recordings of the presentations from the meeting are now available at the additional links. The 87th AMS Annual meeting is set for 14- 18 of January 2007 at the H.B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio, TX, USA.




Addition links on this article: http://www.ametsoc.org/meet/annual/




section1=Climate section2=Data
CDIAC Web-based user interface now offers U.S. monthly climate data   
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/epubs/ndp/ushcn/newushcn.html
Dr. C. N. Williams et al. 2005.
Prepared by Dale Kaiser, CDIAC

The recently introduced graphical user interface offering daily USHCN data now offers users monthly climate data through 2002. Users may download data for individual variables, from individual stations, for whatever time period the user desires. Not only can data be downloaded and saved, but users may also plot data from individual stations in a number of ways, yielding insight into the station's record, and thereby helping to determine the suitability of a station's data for particular applications. The USHCN monthly data are also available directly from the CDIAC ftp area (hhttp://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/ftp/ushcn_monthly/).



For more information contact: kaiserdp@ornl.gov
Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/epubs/ndp/ushcn/newushcn.html




section1=Climate section2=Data
"Climatic Atlas of Clouds over Land" available from the University of Washington Web site   
http://www.atmos.washington.edu/~ignatius/CloudMap/
  The Editor. 2005.

Drs. Carole J. Hahn and Stephen G. Warren have recently produced an online, gridded atlas using the cloud observations data contained in the CDIAC numeric data package (NDP-026D), "Cloud Climatology for Land Stations Worldwide, 1971-1996." The maps included in this atlas were based on analyses of 185 million visual cloud observations made at 5388 weather stations on continents and islands over the 26-year period from 1971-1996. For detailed information on CDIAC NDP-026D, please see the following: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/epubs/ndp/ndp026d/ndp026d.html




Addition links on this article:  http://www.atmos.washington.edu/~ignatius/CloudMap/




section1=Climate section2=Events
Two-week summer course offered on Climate and the Hydrological Cycle  
http://hydroclimate.geog.uu.nl
  The Editor. 2005.

From 4-15 July 2005, a two-week summer course entitled "Climate and the Hydrological Cycle" will be held in Utrecht, the Netherlands. The course is at a graduate level and may be attended by MSc and PhD students as well as scientists and professionals interested in hydrology in the context of the climate system. The aim of the course is to provide an in depth review of the study of the hydrological cycle as part of the climate system. The course focuses on an hydrological perspective on climate, climate change, and climate variability, concerning both the impact of the atmosphere on terrestrial hydrological fluxes, as well as the interaction between hydrological states and fluxes on the climate system. For more information please visit the Web site (http://hydroclimate.geog.uu.nl).




Addition links on this article: http://hydroclimate.geog.uu.nl