Atmospheric


section1=Atmospheric section2=Trends
Atmospheric CO2 record from continuous measurements at Jubany Station, Antarctica updated through 2005  
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/co2/jubany.htm
Dr. Luigi Ciattaglia and  Dr. Claudio Rafanelli . 2006.

The Italian PNRA (National Research Program in Antarctica) have been taking continuous atmospheric CO2 measurements at the Jubany, Antarctica station since 1994 and based on the annual averages calculated from monthly averages, CO2 levels at Jubany have risen from 356.65 in 1994 to 376.75 in 2005.




Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/co2/jubany.htm




section1=Atmospheric section2=Highlights
Atmospheric Levels of CO2 Continue to Rise  
http://www.cmdl.noaa.gov/ccgg/trends/
 Tom Boden. 2006.

Data provided to the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and records compiled by the CDIAC show atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) and releases from fossil-fuel consumption globally continue to rise (see figure below).

Records representative of background tropospheric CO2 conditions furnished by the Global Monitoring Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (GMD/NOAA) and Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) show annual levels of CO2 have risen above 380 parts per million (ppm). The rise, pattern, and trends are seen at sites worldwide and from continuous monitoring sites, as well as sites that employ less frequent flask sampling techniques. The longest continuous record of direct CO2 measurements is from Mauna Loa, Hawaii dating back to the late 1950s when annual CO2 levels were approximately 315 ppm.

Global records of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions and releases resulting from cement production show that more than 7 billion metric tons of carbon are now released annually to the atmosphere. Since 1751 over 300 billion metric tons of carbon have been released to the atmosphere from the consumption of fossil fuels and cement production. Half of these emissions have occurred since the mid 1970s. The latest CDIAC 2003 global fossil-fuel CO2 emission estimate, 7303 million metric tons of carbon, represents an all-time high and a 4.5% increase from 2002.





Addition links on this article: http://www.cmdl.noaa.gov/ccgg/trends/




section1=Atmospheric section2=Events
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting 15-19 February • San Francisco   
http://www.aaas.org/meetings/Annual_Meeting/
 The Editor. 2006.



The AAAS Annual Meeting is an international science and technology extravaganza that influences science professionals around the world and generates extensive news coverage to further the public understanding of science. Seize the opportunity in 2007 to network with peers who share the theme of advancing science and technology in the pursuit of sustainable well-being.




Addition links on this article: http://www.aaas.org/meetings/Annual_Meeting/




section1=Atmospheric section2=Highlights
AAAS Members Elected as Fellows  
http://www.aaas.org/aboutaaas/fellows/2004.shtml
  The Editor. 2006.

In September, the AAAS Council elected 376 members as Fellows of AAAS. These individuals will be recognized for their contributions to science at the Fellows Forum to be held on 18 February 2006 during the AAAS Annual Meeting in St. Louis. The new Fellows will receive a certificate and a blue and gold rosette pin as a symbol of their distinguished accomplishments.




Addition links on this article: http://www.aaas.org/aboutaaas/fellows/2004.shtml




section1=Atmospheric section2=Events
Atmospheric Chemistry at the Interfaces  
http://www.atmosphericinterfaces2006.co.za/
 The  Editor. 2006.



This event will be held in Cape Town, South Africa, from 17 to 23 September 2006. Cape Town is a truly magnificent Conference destination. The Conference venue will be the Cape Town International Convention Centre located near the famous Victoria & Alfred Waterfront – the place to be for both the attendee and for the tourist with easy access to the beautiful beaches, the peninsula, rolling vineyards and magnificent mountains. “Atmospheric Chemistry at the Interfaces_, is the theme for the conference, which will highlight the current state of knowledge of the interaction between various components of the Global System. Atmospheric Chemistry at the Interfaces represents the common interests of the sponsors, and focuses on the great challenges of interdisciplinary research and effective cross-disciplinary communication in times of ever increasing specialization.




Addition links on this article: http://www.atmosphericinterfaces2006.co.za/




section1=Atmospheric section2=Events
Annual ASP Science Team Meeting  
http://www.asp.bnl.gov/
  The Editor. 2006.

The Annual Science Team Meeting will be held 25-27 October 2006, in Boulder, Colorado, USA. The meeting will immediately follow the Milagro investigators workshop. The DOE Atmospheric Science Program has as its long-term goal, developing comprehensive understanding of the atmospheric processes that control the transport, transformation, and fate of energy related trace chemicals and particulate matter. The "current focus of the program is aerosol radiative forcing of climate": aerosol formation and evolution and aerosol properties that affect direct and indirect influences on climate and climate change.




Addition links on this article: http://www.asp.bnl.gov/




section1=Atmospheric section2=Trends
Monthly Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations at 10 Locations Spanning Latitudes 82°N to 90°S   
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/co2/sio-keel.htm
Dr. C.D. Keeling and  Dr. T.P. Whorf. 2005.
Prepared by T.J. Blasing, CDIAC

The monthly Atmospheric CO2 concentrations derived from in situ air samplesatmospheric CO2 mixing ratios at 10 Scripps Institute of Oceanography sites have been updated through 2004. The updated data, along with the methods, trends, and revised graphics are included in Trends Online: A Compendium of Data on Global Change.



For more information contact: cdiac@ornl.gov
Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/co2/sio-keel.htm




section1=Atmospheric section2=Trends
Monthly Atmospheric CO2 Mixing Ratios from the NOAA CMDL Carbon Cycle Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network, 1968-2002   
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/co2/cmdl-flask/cmdl-flask.html
Dr. P.P. Tans and  Dr.  T.J.  Conway. 2005.

The monthly atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios from the NOAA/CMDL Carbon Cycle Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network have been updated with data extending from 1968-2002. The updated data, along with the methods, trends, and revised graphics are now included in Trends Online: A Compendium of Data on Global Change.




Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/co2/cmdl-flask/cmdl-flask.html




section1=Atmospheric section2=FocusAreas
NARSTO's role in the Atmospheric Science Program (ASP)  
http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/programs/NARSTO/narsto.html
  The Editor. 2005.

NARSTO is a public/private partnership, whose membership spans government, the utilities, industry, and academe throughout Mexico, the United States, and Canada. NARSTO's primary mission is to coordinate and enhance policy-relevant scientific research and assessment of tropospheric pollution behavior; its activities provide input for science-based decision-making and determination of workable, efficient, and effective strategies for local and regional air-pollution management. The Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) supports NARSTO by providing funding for the NARSTO Management Coordinator and by the ASP Program Director serving on the NARSTO Executive Steering Committee.




Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/programs/NARSTO/narsto.html